Travel Nursing: 6 Reasons It’s The Most Underrated Job in Healthcare

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By The Gypsy Nurse Staff

June 4, 2018

4204 Views

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Travel Nursing: 6 Reasons It’s The Most Underrated Job in Healthcare

Guest post by Sandy Getzky:

Television is filled with shows about the medical profession. But more often than not, it focuses on the doctors. If you think about it, you’d be hard-pressed to identify any medical show centered on nurses. It’s not that there is none. It’s just that it’s extremely rare. Because nursing as a whole is a very underrated job.

It may just be fiction, but it plays a part in the recognition that nurses get for what they do. Although it’s hard to admit, nurses are generally underappreciated and nursing is an underrated job. They’re often looked down on because they’re not doctors. Just as overworked, although not as glorified.

Read on if you’re looking to learn more about nursing as a profession. You’ll realize that it goes beyond taking orders from doctors, checking blood pressure, or getting blood samples from your arm.

The job can be as flexible as you prefer.

underrated job

As a nurse, you can work full-time or part-time, depending on your availability. You can work for as little as four hours to over twelve hours in a day. Your weekly schedule might consist of working only during weekdays, or you can choose to work also on weekends.

Not just that, but you can also work during the shift you prefer. You can work in the morning, or in the evening. Nurses are needed all day every day, so there isn’t just one set of work hours for nurses.

The job is highly flexible, giving you plenty of options if your working hours are unstable.

The pay is good.

The median pay for nurses is around $70,000. And that’s just for registered nurses in general practice. It varies depending on which state you’re in. The highest paying states are California, Massachusetts, and Hawaii.

You can choose to specialize in a certain field. It’s even preferred. This gives you an edge over the others. And in turn, you can demand higher pay for your specialization. A certified registered nurse anesthetist can earn as much as $135,000 per year.

As a bonus, there’s always room for improvement. You can work your way up and get even better pay as a result.

You can work anywhere.

underrated job

Nursing can be practiced anywhere. It’s a global profession. You can practice it in any state, in any country around the world. You can study in America, and practice in Asia. All you need to do is take and subsequently pass the necessary licensure exam in the region, and you’ll be allowed to practice.

There are even nurses who choose not to be tied up to a specific hospital. Others choose to become a freelance consultant. They don’t report to a single clinic or hospital. Instead, they go directly to their clients for appointments.

You can choose your own career path. There are options available depending on what fits you.

Demand is high.

Nursing, as part of healthcare, will always be needed hence the constant need for nurses. And with the ever-growing population, the number of nurses required is also increasing. Every day, more and more people are getting sick and requiring treatment. And the first line of interaction they get is through nurses.

There are a lot of countries in Europe that have a high demand for nurses. Even in North America, especially in Canada and several states in the USA, the need for more nurses just keeps growing.

Rest assured, you’ll find an opening somewhere if you choose to look.

It is never boring.

It’s a highly engaged profession–centered on delivering service to patients. Every single day, you encounter different people with different needs and different personalities. You won’t end up doing the same routine day in and day out.

Aside from the patients, you also get to interact with other professionals in healthcare, such as doctors, physical therapists, and radiologic technologists, among others. They are just as diverse as the patients nurses deal with.

In addition, patient ailments and symptoms greatly vary. You can treat two people with the same diagnosis and still have two different prescribed treatments.

It is highly rewarding.

Finally, nursing is one of those professions where the reward is almost instant. As is generally the case in healthcare. Nurses get to see their patients get better or get the results they need. Some take years to improve, but nurses get to see their journey through.

Nurses don’t just deal with abstract concepts or figures, but with something more concrete: lives of people are at stake.

This is also why, as rewarding as it usually is, the downside is equally traumatic. When you deal with people’s health and lives, the stakes are high. A single mistake can cause permanent damage to a patient. Or worse: permanent loss.

Nursing is not for the faint of heart. It demands great sacrifice and a lot of emotional strength. Tragedy can strike at any time, and nurses have to be strong enough to face them when it strikes.

There’s a lot to love about nursing.

Equally, there is also a lot that needs to be changed. It is a constantly demanding profession. You won’t always be at your best. But every day will require it from you. Anything less would cost someone their health, or worse, their life.

As Ariel Jacoby once said: “Becoming a nurse is one of the most selfless acts a person can undertake. In a society of so many different races, cultures, customs, and beliefs, nurses are a universal gift to all, and the dedicated work that they do and kindness they deliver on a daily basis should serve as a reminder of the fundamental humanity inside us all.”

That quote beautifully sums up what nursing is. Nursing transcends classifications. It doesn’t care about stereotypes. As long as you are someone that needs treatment and care, nurses are there to help you.

So if you’re thinking about getting into the profession or making a career out of it, just make sure it is something that you really want. Otherwise, you might just end up resenting it. Think about your decision thoroughly. It is a high risk, high reward industry after all.

Sandy Getzky

is the executive coordinating editor at The Global Nail Fungus Organization, a group committed to helping the 100+ million people suffering from finger and toenail fungus. Sandy is also a registered Herbalist and member of the American Herbalist’s Guild.

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