Diagnosis: Shift Work Disorder

Diagnosis: Shift Work Disorder


Shift Work Disorder (SWD)

sleep work disorderShift Work Disorder occurs when the body’s internal sleep-wake clock is out of sync with the work schedule.

Because of this disruption of the body’s natural rhythm, people with Shift Work Disorder often struggle to stay awake during their waking hours or have trouble sleeping during their sleeping hours.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, approximately 15 million Americans work outside of the traditional 9 to 5 schedule. 1 in 4 of these workers may have Shift Work Disorder (SWD)

Risk Factors for SWD may include:

  • Work schedules that include night, early morning, or rotating shifts.
  • Work hours that overlap with the typical sleep period
  • Frequent Mandatory Overtime. Shift work is often combined with extended hours of duty, so fatigue can be a compounding factor.

sleep work disorder


  •  Insomnia
  • Trouble focusing
  • Sleepiness-related accidents
  • Reduced work performance
  • Struggle to stay awake at work
  • Impaired functioning
  • Increased irritability
  • Worsening of heart and stomach disorders

Signs and tests
There are currently no definitive tests available for diagnosis of Shift Work Disorder.  If you think you may be suffering from SWD, please consult with your physician.

There really is no cure for Shift Work Disorder other than changing your work hours to a ‘normal’ daytime work schedule. This may not be a possibility; especially in the nursing field.  Nursing is 24/7 and as long as there are sick people, there will be night shift workers in nursing.  Next week, I am going to discuss some treatments that can help alleviate some of the symptoms of SWD.

Support Groups
Below you will find a couple of Support Groups for those suffering from SWD.  The Gypsy Nurse does not personally endorse these groups, they are only provided as a reference.

I would encourage you to post comments.  Tell me what you want to hear about, what you enjoyed, or how you combat some of the issues discussed.  You may also connect with me via Twitter or Facebook and together we can work on decreasing the symptoms together.

This information is provided by The Gypsy Nurse and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

Treatment: Shift Work Disorder
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Active in the Travel Nursing industry for the past 14 years. Involved with the initial conception of the annual Travelers Conference (http://travelersconference.com) I am dedicated to providing a place for nurses interested in travel nursing to come to find all the answers and information needed to begin a successful career as a Travel Nurse. In addition, I am very active in bringing interested nurses together in real life through social media, and organizing and promoting events, meetings, conferences and many other activities for Travel Nurses and Travel Medical Professionals. Dedicated to providing the next generation of nurses a base of information on the career choice of Travel Nursing by providing Career Services speaking engagements to Nursing Colleges and Student Nursing Associations.


  1. Working nights takes years off of your life and as travelers we don’t even get compensation for working nights. Not that a few bucks an hour makes up for an earlier death..

  2. I prefer night shift. I usually keep to that same schedule, even on off days. Helps to have black out curtains, a ND I use lavender scented linen spray to help me fall asleep. Melatonin also can help with falling asleep, but doesn’t leave me “hung over” like benadryl.